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Whats The Best BBQ Charcoal to Use? | It Really Does Make a Difference…

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halobbq.comIts important to chose the right kind of charcoal for the job.

Charcoal is a light, black residue, consisting of carbon and any remaining ash, obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. Charcoal is usually produced by slow pyrolysis, the heating of wood or other substances in the absence of oxygen (see char and biochar).

Charcoal – Wiki

 

 

 

 

What BBQ Charcoal Should I Use? | It Really Does Make a Difference...

Whats The Best BBQ Charcoal to Use?
Hardwood Lump or Briquette?

In 1897 Ellsworth Zwoyer patented the design for charcoal briquettes. In the 1920s, Henry Ford began making charcoal from the Ford factory wood scraps.

“The Kingsford Company was formed when E.G. Kingsford, a relative of Ford’s, brokered the site selection for Ford’s new charcoal manufacturing plant. The company, originally called Ford Charcoal, was renamed in E.G.’s honor.”

Today we have a vast variety of charcoal types and brands to choose from: The traditional charcoal briquette, American hardwood lump charcoal, oak wood charcoal, pimento wood charcoal, mesquite- and hickory-enhanced charcoal and the list goes on.

 

Based on personal experience, Here’s my charcoal recommendations:
  • Use Lump Charcoal in BBQ Grills
    It generally burns hotter and faster than briquettes.
    You’ll typically get a better sear using lump.
    Be sure to have your squirt gun handy for flame ups.
    If you need a more even, lower temperature with fewer flames, use briquettes.
    Lump works great with steaks, while briquettes in my opinion work better for chicken.
  • Use Briquettes in Charcoal Smokers
    I’ve found briquettes with a few wood chunks work best in the smaller charcoal smokers such as the Brinkmann Gourmet Charcoal Smoker. With over 30 years of bbq experience, I’ve tried many types and brands of charcoal briquettes. I’ve had great results with believe it or not, Backyard Grill Charcoal Briquets, 16.6 lbs. From Walmart. I can get 8 to 10 hours from one bag, vs 1 ½ to almost 2 bags of Kingsford, and its less expensive.
  • Use Split Log Fire Wood on Large Smokers
    Many large smokers are designed to use split log fire wood and are referred to as “Stick Burners”. You could use charcoal briquettes to start a wood-burning fire. However relying solely on briquettes in a large smoker is expensive and not practical.

Again, these are general guidelines from personal experience. I use hotter-cooking lump charcoal for quick-cooking foods such as steaks and burgers. Traditional charcoal briquettes for low-and-slow meats like brisket, ribs etc.

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